OBVIOUSLY, CHAOS

Chaos.

The last Italian elections  have proven, yet again, the fundamental impossibility for Italy to be a normal country. A country where people find work, pay fair and just taxes, and is represented by honest and experienced people.

A country where the sky is blue, and the yellow sun shines kindly over children playing on green grass, while a festive little paper boat drifts toward the horizon on cheerful waves. A normal country. Where miracles are the exception and not the rule that everyone expects every day. A normal country, where the candidates are not suspect billionaires mixed up in hundreds of controversial court cases that range from corruption to child prostitution. Exactly as Silvio Berlusconi is.

A normal country where there should not be characters like Beppe Grillo, who shouts his empty and rabid outrage, playing the card of boorish populism to which Italians, unfortunately, have been accustomed for centuries.

In a civilized country, in fact, Berlusconi would have already been in prison for a long while. But instead, making use of his inordinate wealth, he’s not only free, but even running (again) to lead the country.

More Chaos.

Beppe Grillo shouts. He destroys, yet, to build is something else. One needs to have real ideas and proven experience. A sense of moderation and respect for others. But too often those who shout possess neither the sense of moderation nor respect for others.

Even though I’ve written this post in English, I am Italian and I would like only to be a citizen of a normal country, where the young find work, the people pay their taxes and there is respect for others. I see instead a bad actor, a fraud, an old man with his face lifted by the scalpels of plastic surgeons, with the audacity to want to lead my country.

There is chaos in Italy. And Italy is our country.

 

 

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50 Comments

Filed under Berlusconi, Europe, Italy, politica affari internazionali

50 responses to “OBVIOUSLY, CHAOS

  1. Thank you for reading my blog. Are you living in Italy or abroad? I think your post is so very honest. So many of us who are in love with Italy easily forget what it is really like to live there.

  2. I don’t quite agree with the portrayal of chaos as the result of Italian elections. For sure Beppe Grillo is a loud guy, but somehow he portrays the people who are fed up.

    http://redbarcelona.wordpress.com/2013/03/04/italy/

  3. Bizangelgirl55

    Well said. I agree totally!

  4. Good luck to you. Italy is probably the favorite place I’ve ever lived…Milano. There was an election going on before I left nearly twenty years ago, and it too was chaos. There was no government in place in the largest southern city. I stayed around Maggiore, Como, Verona, Padua, Venice, the Alfama. Torino and Roma and Firenza were maddening with politicians carrying on. Happens everywhere though…I used to write a political column, but I felt dirty all the time, so I quit.
    Later…

  5. Anonymous

    Thank you for enjoying my post… Now onto yours…
    It’s funny that I came here expressly to learn Italian and plan on sticking the year out even though there is little hope of finding a job (the Euro is ruining Italy) and “learning” Italian is not easy in a place that speaks English for the sake of tourists… But in all honesty I came here to get away from the hypercritical country that I call home… the US. I wanted to get away from all the policing and what I consider a corrupt state, CA. But alas here I sit, at my kitchen table wondering what is going to happen to a country that I fell in love with in a coffee table picture book 30 years ago. I feel your pain. Politics is a joke and sometimes I wonder what would happen if there was no gov’t. at all. Chaos in the US for sure. But here I think things would just go on as usual, calmly and orderly in about 6 weeks time…

  6. Thank you for enjoying my post… Now onto yours…
    It’s funny that I came here expressly to learn Italian and plan on sticking the year out even though there is little hope of finding a job (the Euro is ruining Italy) and “learning” Italian is not easy in a place that speaks English for the sake of tourists… But in all honesty I came here to get away from the hypercritical country that I call home… the US. I wanted to get away from all the policing and what I consider a corrupt state, CA. But alas here I sit, at my kitchen table wondering what is going to happen to a country that I fell in love with in a coffee table picture book 30 years ago. I feel your pain. Politics is a joke and sometimes I wonder what would happen if there was no gov’t. at all. Chaos in the US for sure. But here I think things would just go on as usual, calmly and orderly in about 6 weeks time…

  7. stanito

    My dear friend, as usual, I agree and appreciate your words. We are living in interesting times where our country is divided between Old Fashion Italians, whom are short-sighted and dislike any sort of change, and New Young Italians who wish nothing but to change things, starting by putting young and correct people on charge of this country.
    Let’s not loose hope 🙂 because, honestly, Silvio is too old and sick to be able to handle his reputation again, with a new trial, and many more in the queue, I see it difficult. By the way, did you know that Silvio and Gheddafi had the same plastic surgeon?

  8. As much as I find it undemocratic to ask the public to vote again when politicians cannot find a coalition I think the only way out is in fact another election and with it the hope that Grillo’s and Berlusconi’s vote goes down and a working coalition can be formed. Nice article anyway 🙂

  9. I am South African and our post could have been written about this country too. While people in our country starve, fat cats sit at the top and reap the benefits of our hard earned taxes . While education falls apart , their children are educated overseas. I too wish I lived in a country that worked. I think the sad truth is those are becoming few and far between, Thanks for sharing 🙂 Natalie

  10. I know that this may be an impertinent question, but who would you advise other Italians to vote for? I’ve been following the situation and as far as I can see, there isn’t a lot of choice. I hope I’m wrong.

    • This is not at all an impertinent question. It is the right question to ask at least at this very moment. So, Thank you!
      The point is not left, right or center. This should not be any longer the issue. I have nothing against Right or Center or even protester. They just should be presentable and responsible. In this I think that Monti and Bersani or even Renzi are better than Berlusconi and Grill. They might not be “sexy”. Italian should start looking at the core of things, not just at the exteriority…

      • Thanks for your answer. “Sexy” should be at the bottom of any list of political characteristics. This is important to my husband and I as he is Italian and we own property in Sicily. I think he can vote even though we are in Canada. Sadly, he missed the last one. Canada has an appalling record for voter turn out which disturbs me no end. I strongly believe that we must vote and take part in our democratic process, no matter how flawed. We are fortunate to be able to be active members in the running of our governments – so many places in the world do not have this privilege – even if it is in a small way therefore we have a duty to do so. So, I will be prodding my husband to make his vote in the next election! Thanks again!

      • I agree with you Diane. I live in Chicago and I voted. So, kudos to you (and your husband!)…

  11. Very interesting post. Your country sounds as chaotic as mine (Israel). We had elections a month and a half ago, with a clear winner – Netanyahu – but he still hasn’t managed to form a coalition.

    And if you think your country isn’t normal you obviously haven’t been to Israel yet. 🙂

    Thank you too for the like and follow on my blog.

  12. E quest’Italia, un’Italia che c’è anche se viene zittita o irrisa o insultata, guai a chi me la tocca….diceva qualcuno….

  13. I’m like you. I love my country but not its supposed leaders.

  14. It’s so interesting to hear an Italian’s take on the elections, which definitely seem unconventional to this outsider! From my observations I would definitely agree that chaos seems to be the defining word, especially with the outcome. I must admit to not fully understanding everything that went on, the Italian political system is very difficult for this American to comprehend. I would love to see Italy have a more organized government, or at least overcome its current struggles. It’s such a shame that a country that has so much to offer is plagued by these issues relating to organization.

    • Thank you for your response. However, I live in the US and I don’t think that US politics it is much simpler. Plus, always remember that Italy as a parliamentary system instead of presidential (because Italy as Germany after the war decided to make sure that another dictatorship would non be possible).
      It is the quality of people and their luck of real interest in the country that makes me worry, not the process.

  15. Love your blog and attitude! Thank you for making me smile when I see you have visited my blog!…Jill

  16. Good call , Grillo now has to respond to his power. You can’t take people’s votes and be anti-establishment..the 5sm will be found out …but Silvio ..Italy I love you greatly but why did you vote for this man !

  17. Political stability has never been Italy’s strong suit, then again, it continues which is a sign of its strength. Wishing you the best.

  18. Good day I wanted to stop by your site and say thank you for visiting my page today. I hope you enjoy your day.

  19. I can understand your frustration – Beppe Grillo may seem like great theatre to people outside of Italy (Berlusconi is beyond a joke however… ) but it’s another story when all you want is to get on with a normal life. Actually, I’m watching the (UK) Channel 4 news at the moment which is doing a feature on the rise of the Golden Dawn movement in Greece – very depressing – hope to God Italy doesn’t go down that road, although the fact it’s happening anywhere is vile.
    Love your blog by the way – Italy, dogs, art and Zola – marvellous!

    • Thank you so much for your response. I don’t think Italian will follow the path of the Golden Dawn (or at least I hope so). In economics terms is virtually impossible to compare the two countries. We shall see….

  20. And yet, there is order even in chaos. Not an order you may desire; but order non the less. You just have to look for it 🙂

  21. Very good post and timing. Most people would probably just shrug and ask, “what is normal anymore?” I’m glad you give it some perspective substance and depth. But even the US is hardly normal anymore. Abnormal seems to be the norm.

  22. “In Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder and bloodshed…BUT they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love; they had five hundred years of democracy and peace…and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock.” – Orson Welles

  23. Thank you for following my blog. I live in the ‘lucky’ country of Australia and we are in the throes of elections, both my home state of WA and federal. On the whole our system and candidates are worthy of our votes, but we do get the odd ‘rotten egg’. Our corrupt politicians are usually found out and dealt with, thank God. We just have to endure the campaigns during the lead up to the elections – this time, a very long one. God bless you.

  24. It is being felt all across Europe, if not the world, this feeling of helplessness and apathy. To bring real change, real peace and an end to exploitation of the many by the few, I believe ordinary people must do something extraordinary.

    One thing is certain, I’m bewlidered that Italians even tolerate Berlusconi’s name on the ballot paper. He is a proven crook and lunatic and I agree in a normal worl he would have been locked up years ago. Believe me there are many more . . .

    RR

  25. I am not italian but I live in Italy now and before I used to live in Austria and Germany… One thing I understand is: people all over europ are sick and bored by the mainstream politic and politicians. Not only itlaian. People have enough of “Right” and “Left” party! They want change, they want better life and are fed up with mainstream lies. Grillo is a way to show it.
    He might be chaos, but he´s a valid alternativ to criminal Berlusconi and European central bank puppet Monti…Chaos may be, but not the election brings it, the conditions, the politics since years, the lies and unfairness of the banks-politics aliance. The italian vote is only a (moderate) reaction.
    PS: Look also to the last votes in France, whats going on in Greece and soon the elections in Spain…

  26. I will be praying for your country even as I pray for mine. Than you for the follow!

  27. Chaos was the very thing I had a bit of trouble getting used to when living in Italy, but in the end I learned to just go with it. I hope they’ll find a political solution even though it seems hard, coming from Belgium I know what it is to be in a political crisis!

  28. I am afraid the US is rapidly ceasing to be a normal country as well. I hope not, but the signs are all around.

  29. Italy doesn’t have a monopoly on chaos. The US has our share, too. Thanks for reading my blog. Connie

  30. Good Luck with normalcy 😛

    Anything touched by Fallen Creatures cannot be Perfect 🙂
    But, we can always keep trying and above all CHOOSING to be better…

  31. Good information. Lucky me I found your blog by accident
    (stumbleupon). I’ve book-marked it for later!

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